Van Morrison's Anti-Lockdown Songs Slammed by N. Ireland Health Minister

LONDON, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 30: Van Morrison performs at "A Night At Ronnie Scotts: 60th Anniversary Gala" at the Royal Albert Hall on October 30, 2019 in London, England. (Photo by David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images for Ronnie Scotts)
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(David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images for Ronnie Scotts)

Van Morrison is mad as hell, and he's not going to take it anymore. The legendary Irish singer is coming out with three new songs protesting lockdown mandates due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Morrison is releasing the music as a statement against "the way the Government has taken away personal freedoms."

RELATED: Van Morrison Blasts the "Pseudo Science" of Socially Distanced Concerts

“I’m not telling people what to do or think, the government is doing a great job of that already," the singer shared on his website. "It’s about freedom of choice, I believe people should have the right to think for themselves."

Morrison is campaigning for performance venues to open at full capacity again, and feels strongly that the lockdown is in danger of killing live music. Without a date for reopening fully in 2020, many venues will shut down for good.

The new Van Morrison songs are being rolled out individually: "Born To Be Free is released on Friday, September 25, "As I Walked Out" is coming on Friday, October 9, and "No More Lockdown" is set to debut on Friday,October 23. Sample lyric from "No More Lockdown": "No more lockdown/No more government overreach/No more fascist bullies/Disturbing our peace."

Today, Northern Ireland Health Minister Robin Swann has come out to slam Morrison's lyrics:

"I don't know where he gets his facts. I know where the emotions are on this, but I will say that sort of messaging is dangerous," he told BBC Radio Ulster (via RTE). "Our messaging is about saving lives. If Van wanted to sing a song about saving lives, then that would be more in keeping with where we are at the minute. If Van Morrison has counter-scientific facts that he's prepared to stand over, and have that debate with the chief scientific adviser, then I think that's how he should do it."

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