Pink Floyd's Roger Waters Unloads on America: “We’re Living in a Fool’s Hell"

Roger Waters attends the "Roger Waters Us + Them" Photocall during the 76th Venice Film Festival at on September 06, 2019 in Venice, Italy. (Photo by Matteo Chinellato/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
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(Matteo Chinellato/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Pink Floyd legend Roger Waters hosted a screening of his new concert movie, Us + Them, last night in New York City. During a Q&A session after the movie, Rogers made his feelings about the current state of the nation quite clear.

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“The United States of America is not a fool’s paradise; it’s a fool’s hell," Waters said (via Rolling Stone). "And watching [the film], it reminded me that the great battle is the battle between propaganda and love. And propaganda is winning. And sadly, the buttons of the propaganda machine are being pushed by people who are f*cking sick. These sick, sociopathic f*ckers, all of them, every single one of them. Believe it or not, Donald Trump is somewhere down here, floundering around in the muddy water at the bottom of the oligarchic pool.

“And this is a man who has failed at f*cking everything in his life except becoming the biggest … tyrant and mass murderer and mass destroyer of everything that any of us might love or cherish in the whole [world], only because he has the power,” Waters added. “Unfortunately, he has his finger on the button on it, and he’s right. In ‘Pigs,’ when we put up that he has a bigger button and it works, it does. And it’s working all over the world, murdering brown people for profit.”

Waters added that fans can expect even harsher criticism of the country when he hits the road for his upcoming tour: “Wait ’til you see the new show.”

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